March at Morikami Features Taiko Drumming Workshop, Family Fun Days, Educational Classes and More

March brings an exciting array of events and activities to enjoy at Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens! Visitors can strike a beat at a taiko drumming workshop, or create their next culinary masterpiece at a sushi class. From tea ceremony classes to traditional Japanese dance performances, visitors can immerse themselves in Japanese culture with offerings that are sure to be enjoyed by all. See below for a full list of the month’s events.

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Ikebana Flower Arrangement- Ikenobo School 4-week session: Tuesday, March 1, 15, 22 & 29 2016

Time: 1:00pm – 3:00pm

Cost: Non-Members $70; Members $60 (Advance registration required)

Flower fee: $80 Flower arrangement, ikebana, is a traditional Japanese art. The Ikenobo School is the oldest and most traditional. Students in this course learn the basic principles and styles of Ikenobo, creating fresh flower arrangements each week to take home and enjoy.

 

Introduction to Ikebana Flower Arrangement: Sogetsu School

4-week session: Wednesday March 2, 9, 16 & 23, 2016

Time: 10:30am – 12:30pm

Class fee: Non-Members $70; Members $60 (Advance registration required)

Flower fee: $40

Flower arrangement, ikebana, is a traditional Japanese art. Students in this course learn the basic principles and styles of the contemporary Sogetsu School, creating fresh flower arrangements each week to take home and enjoy. This introductory course is a prerequisite for Ikebana Flower Arrangement: Sogetsu School.

 

Sumi-e Ink Painting: Floral

4-week session: Thursday, March 3, 10, 17 & 24, 2016

Time: 10:30am – 12:30pm

Cost: Non-Members $60; Members $55 (Advance registration required)

Sumi-e, literally “charcoal drawing,” is a form of Japanese ink painting brought from China in the 12th century. Students learn to grind their own ink and execute the primary sumi-e brushstrokes to capture the beauty of flowers and bamboo.

Required materials: Listed on www.morikami.org

 

Sumi-e Ink Painting: Landscape

4-week session: Thursday, March 3, 10, 17 & 24, 2016

Time: 1:30pm – 3:30pm

Cost: Non-members $60; Members $55 (Advance registration required)

Sumi-e, literally “charcoal drawing,” is a form of Japanese ink painting brought from China in the 12th century. Students learn to grind their own ink and execute the primary sumi-e brushstrokes to mimic sweeping landscapes.

Required materials: Listed on www.morikami.org

 

Ikebana Flower Arrangement – Sogetsu School

4-week session: Friday, March 4, 11, 18 & 25, 2016

Time: 1:30pm – 3:30pm

Cost: Non-Members $70; Members $60

Flower fee: $40

Flower arrangement, ikebana, is a traditional Japanese art. Students in this course learn the basic principles and styles of the contemporary Sogetsu School, creating fresh flower arrangements each week to take home and enjoy.

 

Tea Ceremony Workshop

Date: Saturday, March 5, 2016

Time: 1:00pm – 3:00pm Cost: $40 (Advance registration required)

Learn the basics of sado, “the way of tea” and the foundation of Japanese tea ceremony. Master Soei Chieko Mihori teaches participants the proper etiquette for a guest invited to tea ceremony. This workshop is a prerequisite for Tea Ceremony Class.

 

Sado Tea Ceremony Class

2-week session: Sunday, March 6 & 20, 2016

Time: Individual appointments begin at 10:15am

Cost: Non-members $55; Members $50 (Advance registration required)

Learn to perform traditional Japanese tea ceremony in the authentic Seishin-an Tea House under the guidance of Master Soei Chieko Mihori. Tea Ceremony Workshop (offered in November, January and March) is a prerequisite for this class.

 

Basics of Sushi

Date: Sunday, March 6, 2016

Time: 10:00am – 12:00pm

Class fee: $70 (Advance registration required)

Explore the rich history of this Japanese culinary tradition and make – and eat – your very own sushi!  Sushi chef Mitsutoshi Sekita leads this hands-on workshop.

Required materials: Sharp 7-8”knife, 10” x 15” cutting board, apron, and dish towel

 

Family Fun: “Mommy & Me” Kamishibai Story Telling Date: Wednesday, March 9, 2016

Time: 10:30am

Cost: Free with paid museum admission (No advance registration required)

Bring the little ones to hear the reading of a Japanese kamishibai folk story! Each month will feature a different story.

 

Beauty in Movement: The Elegance of Japanese Dance Underwritten by the National Endowment for the Arts

Date: Friday, March 11, 2016

Time: 7:00pm (museum doors open at 6:00pm)

Cost: Non-members $10; Members $15 (Advance ticket purchase required)

Take a journey into the world of Japanese dance. Become mesmerized by the elegant movements of classical dance accompanied by the tranquil melodies of the koto, or Japanese zither. Visitors will be treated to a visual and sensory delight by Japanese dancer, Satomi Hirano, and koto performer, Yoshiko Carlton.

Satomi Hirano began her dance instruction in Tokyo at the age of four years. She studied under Master Yoshiwaki Wakayagi and the late Yoshifuji Wakayagi. At 16 years old, she received the title Master Seito Fujisato Wakayagi. She danced “Sagi Musume” for her inauguration, and began her career as a master classical dance teacher in Sasaduka, Tokyo. Following a move to the US, she resumed teaching in Orlando, Florida. Her specialty – Wakayagi-Ryu – is one of the five main classifications of Japanese dance styles. Through her mastery of classical Japanese dance, coupled with her certification in Yamano-style kimono dressing, she is dedicated to revive and spread traditional Japanese culture.

Yoshiko Carlton is a native of Kagoshima, Japan. She started her koto training at the age of nine years. She continued her koto studies after moving to Florida with Mrs. Kyoko Okamato, founder of the Washington Toho Koto Society based in Washington D.C. She furthered her studies with renowned 25 stringed koto player, Brian Yamakoshi.  Since 1990 she has directed, mentored, and performed with the taiko drumming ensemble Fushu Daiko, in which she was a founding member. She established “Yoshi no Kai”, “Friends of Koto” in 2002 for the purpose of educating and introducing koto music to the West. In 2003, she was awarded a certificate of recognition by the Consulate General of Japan in Miami for her contribution in promoting Japanese culture, especially Koto, to the community.

 

Japanese Language Intensive Workshop: Kanji 2-day workshop: Saturday, March 12 & 26, 2016 Time: 1:00pm – 5:00pm

Cost: $80 (Advance registration required)

Kanji are the Chinese characters used in the Japanese language. This hands-on workshop focuses on learning the stroke orders and stroke types of essential components of kanji. It will also incorporate the use of traditional writing implements, the brush and ink. Students are expected to write basic kanji accurately and in turn to learn advanced kanji more effectively. Students at any level may take this course.

Materials to bring:  black liquid ink*, Canson Biggie Newsprint Pad (18 x 24 Inches, 100 Sheet Pad)

*available at the museum store

 

The Way of Taiko – The Heartbeat of Japan (Taiko Drum Workshop)

Date: Sunday, March 13, 2016 Time: 11:00 am – 1:00 pm & 2:00pm – 4:00pm

Cost: $50 (Advance registration required)

Explore the origins of Japanese taiko and learn to drum in this workshop taught by top performers from South Florida’s renowned Fushu Daiko.

Recommended dress: Comfortable clothes and shoes; jewelry is not recommended.

 

Nihongo: Japanese Language Level I, II, III and IV:

8-week session: Sunday, March 13, 20, April 3, 10, 24, May 1, 8 & 15, 2016

Time:

Nihongo Level I: 10:15am – 11:15am

Nihongo Level II: 11:20am – 12:20pm

Nihongo Level III: 12:20pm – 1:20pm

Nihongo Level IV:  1:20pm – 2:20pm

Cost: Non-Members $90; Members $80 (Advance registration required)

Japanese Language Level I & II cover Lessons 1-14 and introduce hiragana and katakana.

Japanese Language Level III & IV covers Lessons 15-25 and an introduction to writing kanji.

Required materials: Japanese for Busy People I (3rd edition, CD attached paperback, kana version)

 

Demonstration of Sado: The Way of Tea

Date: Saturday, March 19, 2016

Cost: $5 with paid museum admission

(No advance registration available, must purchase ticket day of, seating is first come, first served)

Observe Japanese sado, “the way of tea,” an ever-changing demonstration rich in seasonal subtleties. The true spirit of sado — harmony (wa), reverence (kei), purity (sei), tranquility (jaku) — along with a sip of green tea and a sweet can bring a calm perspective into a busy life.

 

Family Fun: Origami Workshop

Date: Saturday, March 26, 2016

Time: 12:00pm – 3:00pm

Cost: Free with paid museum admission (No advance registration required)

Join us to learn a few simple origami techniques and make a few fun objects.

 

On View: Perseverance: Japanese Tattoo Tradition in a Modern World 

Dates: Friday, February 26 – Sunday, May 8, 2016

Curated by Takahiro Kitamura, photographed and designed by Kip Fulbeck, and organized for tour by the Japanese American National Museum in Los Angeles, California. Funded in part by the National Endowment for the Arts.

This exhibition explores the artistry of traditional Japanese tattoos along with its rich history and influence on modern tattoo practices. Perseverance underscores Japanese tattooing as an art form by acknowledging its roots in ukiyo-e prints and examining current practices and offshoots of Japanese tattooing in the U.S. and Japan. As Japanese tattoos have moved into the mainstream, the artistry and legacy of Japanese tattooing remain both enigmatic and misunderstood. Often copied by practitioners and aficionados in the West without regard to its rich history, symbolism, or tradition, the Japanese tattoo as a form of art is commonly reduced to a visual or exotic caricature. Conversely, mainstream Japanese culture still dismisses the subject itself as underground, associating it more with some of its clientele than with the artists practicing it. Both of these mindsets ignore the vast artistry and rich history of the practice.  Although tattooing is largely seen as an underground activity in Japan, Japanese tattoo artists have pursued their passions, applied their skills, and have risen to become internationally acclaimed artists. Through the endurance and dedication of these tattoo artists, Japanese tattooing as a genre of art has persevered, and is now internationally renowned for its artistry, lineage, historical symbolism, and skill.  Perseverance features the work of seven internationally acclaimed tattoo artists, Horitaka, Horitomo, Chris Horishiki Brand, Miyazo, Shige, Junii, and Yokohama Horiken, along with tattoo works by selected others. Through the display of a variety of photographs, including life-sized pictures of full body tattoos, these artists cover a broad spectrum of the current world of Japanese tattooing.

 

Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens has been a center for Japanese arts and culture in South Florida since its opening in 1977. Morikami invites guests to discover South Florida’s heritage and its connection with Japan, and explore a series of six diverse gardens inspired by a different historical period and style of Japanese gardening. Experience traditional and contemporary Japanese culture through world-class exhibits, varied educational programs and seasonal events, world-class bonsai display, Pan-Asian cuisine and a distinctive Museum Store.