Tampa Theatre Announces “A Nightmare on Franklin Street” 2016 Lineup

untitledTampa Theatre announces the return of A Nightmare on Franklin Street for a freakish fourth year!  Tampa’s most historic – and most haunted – majestic movie palace will present ten nights of petrifying programming sponsored by The Vault of Souls, with enough variety to haunt everyone from the average Halloween enthusiast to the hard-core horror fan:

FRIDAY 10/21               OLD-SCHOOL OPENER

·         2:00pm       Balcony to Backstage Ghost Tour

Who was Fink Finley? Why does the Lady in White still roam the mezzanine? And what has led to Tampa Theatre being known as one of the most haunted buildings in town? Learn the Theatre’s secrets, stories, art and architecture with a “balcony to backstage” tour that will focus on the historic movie palace’s ghostly guests. The 90-minute tour will kick off in the lobby and will feature a special “demon”stration of the Mighty Wurlitzer Theatre Organ.

Tickets are $10 for adults and $8 for children ages 2 to 12. Tampa Theatre Members are free. Space is limited, so arrive early!

·         7:30pm       A NIGHTMARE ON ELM STREET (1984)

Widely forgotten in the tumult of sequels, rip-offs and parodies that followed in its wake is the fact that A Nightmare on Elm Street, Wes Craven’s original 1984 slasher classic, was not just a huge box-office success, but a critical success as well. Film reviewers recognized something fresh in the genre — after Halloween revived the idea of slasher movies and made them personal and Friday the 13th showed there was still room to play within the concept, Nightmare recognized that you could push the boogeyman idea all the way into the surreal and have a whole new canvas to paint on.

Freddy is an iconic modern monster with a more developed set of skills than unkillable Michael Myers or the… well… similarly unkillable Jason. He can enter your dreams, take other shapes, murder you with creativity. Freddy seems to always be performing his acts of violence for a silent, invisible audience; as a movie monster, he’s movie first and monster second.  Myers and Jason are actors. Freddy is a director.  1984 / R / 1h31m / Horror

·         10:00pm     FRIDAY THE 13TH (1980)

The success of John Carpenter’s Halloween inspired a lot of imitators, as success in the movie business always does. The difference in this case was that many of the imitators were actually really good in their own right. Friday the 13th realizes something that took the rest of Hollywood more than 10 years to come around to: finding a movie scary often tickles the part of your brain that also finds a movie funny.

Friday the 13th was always intended to be a little funny. The setup was intentionally a summer-camp movie in which the counselors just happened to start getting killed off. And it twisted the formula in just the right ways: Mrs. Voorhees, along with the famous jump-scare reveal, basically demanded a sequel. Join us on Friday night for Friday the 13th, and remember how it all began — again.
1980 / R / 1h35m / Horror

Tickets for “A Nightmare on Franklin Street” classic films are $10 for general admission and $8 for Tampa Theatre Members, available at the box office, located at 711 N. Franklin Street in downtown Tampa, or online at TampaTheatre.org (service fees apply).

SATURDAY 10/22          HOMESTEAD HAUNTINGS

·         11:30am     Balcony to Backstage Ghost Tour

Who was Fink Finley? Why does the Lady in White still roam the mezzanine? And what has led to Tampa Theatre being known as one of the most haunted buildings in town? Learn the Theatre’s secrets, stories, art and architecture with a “balcony to backstage” tour that will focus on the historic movie palace’s ghostly guests. The 90-minute tour will kick off in the lobby and will feature a special “demon”stration of the Mighty Wurlitzer Theatre Organ.

Tickets are $10 for adults and $8 for children ages 2 to 12. Tampa Theatre Members are free. Space is limited, so arrive early!

·         2:00pm       THE INNOCENTS (1961)                        

 

The Innocents is a ghost story, and people have been scaring each other with ghost stories for approximately as long as there have been people. But it’s worth bearing in mind that before Hitchcock — an oversimplification, but not much of one — this is what scary movies looked like. They were gothic, atmospheric affairs, psychological rather than visceral, creepy rather than terrifying. And The Innocents is very creepy. Full of haunted children and disembodied specters (and based on an excellent Henry James short story), The Innocents gets under your skin and stays there.
1961 / Not Rated / 1h 40m / Thriller

·         4:45pm       BEETLEJUICE (1988)

Consider this timeline: Tim Burton makes Pee-wee’s Big Adventure in 1985 with huge financial success. As a result, Warner Bros. is willing to pay for him to develop a script for the next movie he wants to make, but not quite ready to green-light its production, so he takes a job directing Beetlejuice. In the process he gets Michael Keaton to play Beetlejuice, who he would eventually also put in the famous Batman cape and cowl. So from 1985 to 1990, Tim Burton makes Pee-Wee’s Big Adventure, Beetlejuice, Batman and Edward Scissorhands. That’s maybe the weirdest run of four enormously successful movies in a row ever. And Beetlejuice is the first time we see Tim Burton being himself: full of weird, spindly horror designs, perfectly cast, and dripping with his particular sense of humor, Beetlejuice immediately found its way into audiences’ hearts. There’s everything to love about this dark, hilarious comedy.  1988 / PG / 1h 32m / Comedy

·         7:30pm       THE CONJURING (2013) with special guest Andrea Perron

The “young-family-moves-into-a-haunted-house” movie is a rich and storied horror subgenre, full of classics and can’t-miss favorites. The Conjuring is a fairly new but gleefully received member of the canon. And as a certifiably haunted historical movie palace, believe me — we know from haunted.

It’s got everything you want in a haunted house movie: terrified kids, the hiring of exorcists, disembodied violence, a geographical history of unexplained phenomena. The current owners of the house portrayed in the movie sued the filmmakers, claiming that their house is now the constant object of vandalism and mischief, which is always a good sign. But most exciting of all, we’ll be joined by special guest Andrea Perron, the eldest daughter of the family whose real-life haunting experience inspired the movie!  2h 26m/Rated R/Horror

Tickets for “A Nightmare on Franklin Street” classic films are $10 for general admission and $8 for Tampa Theatre Members, available at the box office, located at 711 N. Franklin Street in downtown Tampa, or online at TampaTheatre.org (service fees apply).

SUNDAY 10/23              SCREAM QUEEN SUNDAY

·         2:00pm       HOCUS POCUS (1993)

Hocus Pocus had a decent enough first release, but really found new life on television and home video in the years after its initial theatrical run. There’s always room for a fun-loving, friendly Halloween movie in people’s lives, and Hocus Pocus continues to be as warm and welcoming as ever. Most of that is probably due to the perfect casting of the trio of witches (Bette Midler, Kathy Najimy, and Sarah Jessica Parker), who are the nominal antagonists but real stars of the movie. With such joyous, full performances (and those pitch-perfect costumes!), Hocus Pocus will remain a family favorite, the comfort food of Halloween movies, for a long time to come.
1993 / PG / 1hr 36min/Family

·         4:30pm       PSYCHO (1960)

Psycho is based on a book of the same name by Robert Bloch. During its writing, Bloch was living 35 miles away from the real-life murders of Ed Gein, a serial killer who flayed his victims in what psychiatrists believed was an attempt to make a skin suit so he could pretend to be his dead, domineering, puritanical mother. It’s often claimed that Psycho was inspired by Ed Gein. Not so; he wasn’t caught until just before the book was finished. It’s just a horrific coincidence. Sleep well!

Psycho the movie is, of course, a master-class in suspense. Alfred Hitchcock reinvented how to scare people with movies, and he did so with such precision and effectiveness that the films he made are still used as models 50 years later. Psycho puts you, the viewer, in such tight contact with its actors that you almost can’t breathe; it’s like you’re physically in the room with Anthony Perkins and Janet Leigh. And the cold nonchalance with which it documents the aftermath of its violence is almost more shocking than the violence itself. It was made in 1960, and it will still scare the pants off you today. 1960 / R / 1h 49m / Thriller

·         7:00pm       SCREAM (1996)

Great ideas are only obvious in hindsight. Of course somebody should have made a movie like Scream, we all say, seated comfortably in 2016 when the whole idea of a horror movie that’s about horror movies has been played out, lampooned, revived and reburied over the past 20 years. But think about the horror movie landscape pre-Scream: From the revival of the slasher movie in 1978 to 1996, probably thousands of teenagers pretended to be murdered on film. Not once did any of them wink to the audience or say “hey, this seems like a movie.” Are we expected to believe they lived in a universe without horror movies? Had Jason’s victims in Friday the 13th part VII never seen Halloween 4?

Scream’s premise is that they could have.  But further than that, the fact that horror movie victims might be familiar with horror movie tropes makes the movie itself scarier. It means no one is safe. It’s metafictional in the best possible way. And yes it had too many sequels, and we all went overboard with metafiction in the ‘90s and early ‘00s, but for at least a minute there, Scream was something that had never been done before.  1996 / R / 1h 51m / Horror

·         10:00pm     HALLOWEEN (1978)

The script for the original 1978 Halloween was written in 10 days, which, yeah, actually seems like plenty of time, come to think of it. It’s a pretty terse movie: silent killer menaces teens, travels with unsettling quickness but only when off camera, murders many, can’t be stopped. How many pages do you need?

But simplicity is a virtue; Halloween’s premise is simple but contains everything necessary. It takes the tension and psychological terror of a Hitchcock movie, strips out everything but the bare plot, and renders the audience complicit and uncomfortable by forcing the perspective of the monster, the infamous Michael Myers, on them.  It’s so powerful a filmic gut-punch that it influenced the direction of a whole genre of movies for decades to come and made a star out of the original “scream queen,” Jamie Lee Curtis. 1978 / R / 1h 31m / Horror

This show will include a filmed interview with Halloween director John Carpenter after the movie.

Tickets for “A Nightmare on Franklin Street” classic films are $10 for general admission and $8 for Tampa Theatre Members, available at the box office, located at 711 N. Franklin Street in downtown Tampa, or online at TampaTheatre.org (service fees apply).

MONDAY 10/24

·         7:30pm       THE WITCH (2015)

The Witch was one of the most talked-about movies of 2015, burning up the Sundance Film Festival and landing near the top of a lot of critics’ best-of-the-year lists. A dark, harrowing fairytale, The Witch examines what life would have been like for religious, superstitious Puritans in the 17th century if faced with a supernatural threat. Placed in a world where magic and witchcraft are undeniably real and no authority exists to which you can appeal for protection, in which a witch (say that three times fast…) would have been as real a threat to life and limb as a rabid wolf or a wielded knife, the audience is forced to confront their own ideas of what evil and terror might actually mean.
2015 / R / 1h 32m / Horror

·         10:00pm     IT FOLLOWS (2014)

2014 indie horror darling It Follows takes the subtext of a thousand cheap slasher flicks and elevates it into stated premise. The idea is simple: having sex is a death sentence. The execution of that idea is flawless, though — presented in a flow of dreamlike logic and not-quite-there visuals, scored with music that hums in your bones, It Follows reminds you why all those cheap slasher flicks existed in the first place. Everybody’s teenage years are a blur of inchoate fears, guilt about hormonal desire, and the suspicious feeling that anonymous strangers are both sinister and paying undue attention to you.  2014 / R / 1h 40m / Horror

Tickets for “A Nightmare on Franklin Street” classic films are $10 for general admission and $8 for Tampa Theatre Members, available at the box office, located at 711 N. Franklin Street in downtown Tampa, or online at TampaTheatre.org (service fees apply).

TUESDAY 10/25             FORTUNE-TELLER TUESDAY

·         2:00pm       Balcony to Backstage Ghost Tour

Who was Fink Finley? Why does the Lady in White still roam the mezzanine? And what has led to Tampa Theatre being known as one of the most haunted buildings in town? Learn the Theatre’s secrets, stories, art and architecture with a “balcony to backstage” tour that will focus on the historic movie palace’s ghostly guests. The 90-minute tour will kick off in the lobby and will feature a special “demon”stration of the Mighty Wurlitzer Theatre Organ.

Tickets are $10 for adults and $8 for children ages 2 to 12. Tampa Theatre Members are free. Space is limited, so arrive early!

·         7:30pm       DR. TERROR’S HOUSE OF HORRORS (1965)

An anthology movie, Dr. Terror’s House of Horrors is “hosted” by Dr. Schreck (yes, Schreck is German for “terror”) as he tells the fortunes of several fellow travelers on a train trip. Those fortunes make up the horror stories in the movie. There’s a vampire tale, a ghostly disembodied hand, a story about a werewolf… pretty much everything you’d expect from a good horror anthology.

But best of all, we’ll be joined in the lobby by some real-life “fortune tellers” before the film! Doors will open at 6:30pm, and psychics from Earth Angels Gifts will be on hand to perform complimentary readings for our guests before the film. Hopefully none of your fortunes will have werewolves in them, but hey, we don’t judge.  1965 / Not Rated / 1h 38m / Horror

·         10:00pm     POLTERGEIST (1982)

If all you know about Poltergeist is the little girl sitting in front of the TV and crooning “they’re heeeere,” you owe it to yourself to see the whole movie: It’s more than a MAD Magazine joke. Poltergeist pulls off the ultimate horror movie trick — while you’re watching it, you almost manage to forget that it’s a horror movie. It’s a funny, touching story about some parents exploring a new little wrinkle in their lives. Until, almost before you recognize what’s happening, a monster comes. And now the characters you shared joy and humor with must do battle with unknowable evil. The original tagline for Poltergeist was “it knows what scares you.” And it truly does.  1982 / PG / 1h 54m / Horror

Tickets for “A Nightmare on Franklin Street” classic films are $10 for general admission and $8 for Tampa Theatre Members, available at the box office, located at 711 N. Franklin Street in downtown Tampa, or online at TampaTheatre.org (service fees apply).

WEDNESDAY 10/28       TALES OF THE SUPERNATURAL

·         7:30pm       Tampa Ghost Stories with Deborah Frethem, author of “Haunted Tampa: Spirits of the Bay”

 

Local author and storyteller Deborah Frethem takes to Tampa Theatre’s historic stage for an intimate evening of ghost stories and supernatural tales from around the Bay area.  Following the performance, Frethem will sign copies of her books, including Haunted Ybor City, Ghost Stories of St. Petersburg and Haunted Tampa: Spirits of the Bay, with sales benefitting Tampa Theatre’s ongoing preservation and restoration efforts.

Tickets for this special “A Nightmare on Franklin Street” live event are $10 for general admission and FREE for Tampa Theatre Members, available at the box office, located at 711 N. Franklin Street in downtown Tampa, or online at TampaTheatre.org (service fees apply).

 

·         10:00pm     THE OMEN (1976)        

Rosemary’s Baby, The Exorcist, The Omen – sometime in the late ‘60s or early ‘70s, we all got real scared of our children. Gee, I wonder what that could be about? But whereas Rosemary’s Baby hinged on the conflicted nature of the visceral and alien experience of the less-frequently discussed parts of child-bearing, The Omen makes no bones about where its loyalties lie: the kid is a devil, the dad (Gregory Peck) is the hero, and he’s going to do whatever it takes to stop his son. The Omen wears its B-movie heart on its sleeve in a really endearing way, but the originality of its treatment and its enthusiasm for the material make it a timeless favorite. 1976 / R / 1h 51m / Horror

Tickets for “A Nightmare on Franklin Street” classic films are $10 for general admission and $8 for Tampa Theatre Members, available at the box office, located at 711 N. Franklin Street in downtown Tampa, or online at TampaTheatre.org (service fees apply).


FRIDAY 10/28  

·         2:00pm       Balcony to Backstage Ghost Tour

Who was Fink Finley? Why does the Lady in White still roam the mezzanine? And what has led to Tampa Theatre being known as one of the most haunted buildings in town? Learn the Theatre’s secrets, stories, art and architecture with a “balcony to backstage” tour that will focus on the historic movie palace’s ghostly guests. The 90-minute tour will kick off in the lobby and will feature a special “demon”stration of the Mighty Wurlitzer Theatre Organ.

Tickets are $10 for adults and $8 for children ages 2 to 12. Tampa Theatre Members are free. Space is limited, so arrive early!

·         7:30pm       SHOCK TREATMENT (1981)

This movie sure is something. A kind of continuation (rather than a direct sequel) of its infamous companion The Rocky Horror Picture Show, Shock Treatment returns to the characters of Brad and Janet (now played by different actors) as they find themselves — seriously, try to follow me here — trapped in an enclosed city that has been taken over by a fast-food magnate for the purposes of filming a series of nightmarish television shows. Patricia Quinn and Richard O’Brien (Magenta and Riff Raff from RHPS) costar as sibling doctors (except maybe they’re not?) at a mental hospital, which is also the setting of a soap opera.

A more conventional movie in a lot of ways than Rocky Horror — if you can believe that — it still has a lot to offer big fans of the earlier movie. And it’s bizarre and fascinating enough to appeal to those who love film oddities of all kinds. 1981 / PG / 1h 34m / Musical

Tickets for “A Nightmare on Franklin Street” classic films are $10 for general admission and $8 for Tampa Theatre Members, available at the box office, located at 711 N. Franklin Street in downtown Tampa, or online at TampaTheatre.org (service fees apply).

·         11:00pm     THE ROCKY HORROR PICTURE SHOW (1975)

Does The Rocky Horror Picture Show need any introduction? It’s a cultural artifact with unlimited lifespan — it creates new audiences for itself each screening, and will most likely continue to be shown in theatres until the end of linear time. The plot of RHPS basically doesn’t matter (but here it is in brief anyway: an engaged couple get lost and wander to a nearby castle, where they are captured, kind of, by a Transylvanian doctor in lingerie and his entourage, who are attempting to create a life form, but are actually in some cases space aliens… it’s complicated); all that matters is the experience of seeing it. The audience owns the movie now. They sing along, dress in costume, shout responses to favorite lines, perform alongside the film as it plays. And if you’re a “virgin”, as first-timers are known, this is a perfect opportunity to learn what you’ve been missing all these years. 1975 / R / 1h 40m / Musical

A local shadow cast will provide a live pre-show and audience participation throughout the film. Guests are encouraged to bring their own toilet paper, cards, newspapers, toast and other props – but please, no hot dogs, rice or water guns. For a great audience participation guide for Rocky Horror “virgins,” visit www.badmovies.org/movies/rockyhorror/audience/  (Site contains adult language and content!)

Tickets for The Rocky Horror Picture Show are $15 for general admission and $13 for Tampa Theatre Members, available at the box office, located at 711 N. Franklin Street in downtown Tampa, or online at TampaTheatre.org (service fees apply).

SATURDAY, 10/29         SPIRITED SATURDAY

·         11:30am     Balcony to Backstage Ghost Tour

Who was Fink Finley? Why does the Lady in White still roam the mezzanine? And what has led to Tampa Theatre being known as one of the most haunted buildings in town? Learn the Theatre’s secrets, stories, art and architecture with a “balcony to backstage” tour that will focus on the historic movie palace’s ghostly guests. The 90-minute tour will kick off in the lobby and will feature a special “demon”stration of the Mighty Wurlitzer Theatre Organ.

Tickets are $10 for adults and $8 for children ages 2 to 12. Tampa Theatre Members are free. Space is limited, so arrive early!

·         3:00pm       GHOSTBUSTERS (1984)             

 

Ghostbusters is the rare action comedy that works spectacularly as both action movie and comedy. The cast and crew (Dan Aykroyd, Harold Ramis, Sigourney Weaver, director Ivan Reitman, and especially Bill Murray) are at the absolute peak of their powers. The film imagines an alternate New York City that feels populated, organic and believable. And it creates a new supernatural mythology that has persisted ever since: the Ghostbuster uniform and equipment are as iconic at this point as Dracula’s cape or Frankenstein’s bolts. Twenty-plus years down the line, it’s obvious that no movie is perfect. But Ghostbusters deserves its reputation as a modern classic, one of the best movies of its time, and you deserve to see it in the theatre as it was meant to be seen.
1984 / PG / 1h 45m / Comedy

·         6:00pm       THE HAUNTING (1963)

At the time of its release The Haunting, based on the novel The Haunting of Hill House, was considered a fairly straightforward movie about a handful of people in a house possessed by evil spirits. But its reputation has only grown in the decades since. Steven Spielberg calls it one of the “seminal films” of his youth, and one of the scariest films ever made. Many critics agree that it is one of the most frightening films ever. Its innovative effects and groundbreaking camerawork make it feel much fresher and more modern than other films made contemporaneously. And its unstable atmosphere creates a disturbing, unsettling feeling in the viewer that persists long after the movie itself has ended.  1963 / Not Rated / 1h 52m / Horror

Tickets for “A Nightmare on Franklin Street” classic films are $10 for general admission and $8 for Tampa Theatre Members, available at the box office, located at 711 N. Franklin Street in downtown Tampa, or online at TampaTheatre.org (service fees apply).

·         9:00pm       Late-Night Lights-Off Paranormal Investigation

In 1965, Tampa Theatre’s projectionist Foster “Fink” Finley died after 35 years of service to his beloved movie palace. Strange occurrences have been reported in and around the projection booth ever since – an unexplained tap on the shoulder, doors opening and closing, shadows passing through the room, and the lingering smell of lilac aftershave… Foster’s favorite.

But Fink isn’t the only spirit suspected of haunting the Theatre’s historic halls. Join Tampa Theatre as they partner with experts from Genesis Paranormal Services and GhostStop to bring you an evening of lights-off investigation into the building’s five most common supernatural claims.

The four-hour experience includes heavy hors d’oeuvres, complimentary popcorn and soft drinks, expert guides from the paranormal community and demonstrations of professional paranormal investigative equipment. It will truly be a once-in-a-lifetime experience guaranteed to make you see Tampa’s grand movie palace in a different light.

Tickets are $60 for general admission and $50 for Tampa Theatre Members at the box office, located at 711 N. Franklin Street in downtown Tampa, or online at TampaTheatre.org (service fees apply).

 

SUNDAY 10/30              STEPHEN KING SUNDAY

·         2:30pm       THE NIGHTMARE BEFORE CHRISTMAS (1993)

Tim Burton’s entire artistic output, his oeuvre, is about presenting outcasts as heroic figures. Telling audiences that just because you feel different from everyone else, doesn’t mean you aren’t exactly who you’re supposed to be. Pee-Wee, Edward Scissorhands, Lydia from Beetlejuice, and Jack Skellington all have that in common. They’re outsiders in their own world, they’re loners and rebels, and they have to learn to love themselves for it.

Jack lives in a land that’s entirely made up of the trappings of Halloween, and what he longs for most of all is Christmas. But he will have to struggle with the other denizens of Halloween Town to help them understand what makes Santa Claus and Christmas so special. Will he be able to explain his obsession and find his place? Bring the kids and come see.  1993 / PG / 1h 16m / Family

·         5:00pm       CARRIE (1976)

A lot of horror fiction springs from the sort of amplification of fears and apprehensions that people all feel already. A scary, unknown place with drafty windows and creaky doors turns to a haunted house. Those sounds in the dark forest are werewolves. The stresses of adolescent hormones and societal pressure mean that slashers kill bad kids first. It’s the same instinct that turned unusually wise women in the Middle Ages to witches in public imagination — the first to be punished when the crops failed or the livestock died.

Carrie, then, is an externalization of the incredible anxiety of being a teenage woman, disagreeing with your mother and undergoing the changes of maturity. But rather than framing her as a monster… well, what I’m asking is who, having been treated the way Carrie has, wouldn’t have done the same thing? Who among us didn’t want, at least a little bit, to incinerate everyone at their high school? We’re on your side, Carrie. Those jerks had it coming. 1976 / R / 1h 38m / Horror

·         7:30pm       MISERY (1990)

Here is a list of actors who turned down the role of Paul Sheldon, writer and kidnap victim in Misery, before it was offered to James Caan: William Hurt, Kevin Kline, Michael Douglas, Harrison Ford, William Hurt again, Dustin Hoffman, Robert De Niro, Al Pacino, Richard Dreyfuss, Gene Hackman and Robert Redford. If you had been walking by the Castle Rock Entertainment offices during a certain segment of 1989, they may have offered you the role. Why would so many talented actors turn down the part? Surely it’s not the case that they thought the William Goldman script treatment of a Stephen King novel wouldn’t be good.  Were they afraid of looking weak in the face of a dominating, female villain? The mind reels.

In any case it’s good that they did, because James Caan is fantastic as Sheldon. But it’s also good that he wasn’t afraid to look weak, because Kathy Bates plays just about the creepiest, most dominating, fiercest villain in modern memory. There’s something contemporary and relevant about the idea of an obsessed fan as horror movie villain, and Misery still works as psychological thriller today.  1990 / R / 1h 47m / Suspense

·         10:00pm     CREEPSHOW (1982)

Rounding out our Stephen King block is Creepshow, a horror anthology movie directed by the famed George Romero and starting Hal Holbrook, Adrienne Barbeau and Leslie Nielsen, among others. The frame story of the movie is of a kid reading a classic horror comic book of the 1950s, something like Vault of Horror or Tales from the Crypt, and the movie plays homage to those comics in both tone and effects.

The horror anthology has had a long history in movies, but had mostly died off until its revival in 2012 with the V/H/S series. Something about horror is particularly suited to anthology, though; short pieces can develop a scary idea quickly without requiring a lot of development of character relationships, and with disconnected stories the audience never gets the feeling that they’re missing anything. Creepshow pulls it off in delightfully irreverent fashion. Come for the Stephen King tie-in, stay for the miniature yeti murder. (Wait, what?)  1982 / R / 2h 10m / Horror

Tickets for “A Nightmare on Franklin Street” classic films are $10 for general admission and $8 for Tampa Theatre Members, available at the box office, located at 711 N. Franklin Street in downtown Tampa, or online at TampaTheatre.org (service fees apply).


MONDAY 10/31            HALLOWEEN

·         10:00am     “Mummy & Me” Movie: HOTEL TRANSYLVANIA (2012)

Everybody needs a vacation now and then. Doesn’t matter how much you love your job, sometimes you just need to get away from everything for a while. Especially when you’re under threat of persecution by human society because you’re like a werewolf or a mummy or Frankenstein’s monster or whatever.

That’s why Dracula (Adam Sandler) has turned his castle in Transylvania into a kind of bed-and-breakfast for monsters. They’re welcome to stay with him in his five-star hotel and be safe from the humans who are trying to eradicate them. But when a regular person, Jonathan (Andy Samberg) shows up expecting to book a room, how will Dracula get him to leave without attracting the attention of other humans? And what happens if Jonathan and Dracula’s daughter (Mavis, voiced by Selena Gomez) fall in love? This animated Halloween comedy is a good laugh for all ages and a great way for Mummies to spend Halloween morning with their little boys and ghouls!
2012 / PG / 1h 31m / Family

Tickets for this special “Mummy & Me” screening are $10 for adults and FREE for kids ages 12 and younger, available at the box office, located at 711 N. Franklin Street in downtown Tampa, or online at TampaTheatre.org (service fees apply).

·         2:00pm       Balcony to Backstage Ghost Tour

Who was Fink Finley? Why does the Lady in White still roam the mezzanine? And what has led to Tampa Theatre being known as one of the most haunted buildings in town? Learn the Theatre’s secrets, stories, art and architecture with a “balcony to backstage” tour that will focus on the historic movie palace’s ghostly guests. The 90-minute tour will kick off in the lobby and will feature a special “demon”stration of the Mighty Wurlitzer Theatre Organ.

Tickets are $10 for adults and $8 for children ages 2 to 12. Tampa Theatre Members are free. Space is limited, so arrive early!

·         7:30pm       I DRINK YOUR BLOOD (1970)

Okay, strap in for this one. We see “A Nightmare on Franklin Street” off for another year with I Drink Your Blood, a gruesome, gross-out gorefest from 1970 about a whole town infected by rabies and lusting for victims. It was one of the first movies to be rated X based on violence rather than sexual content, though it was cut down enough to receive an R-rating before distribution.

At turns campy and nauseating, you probably already know if this is the kind of exploitation movie that’s appealing to you. It’s hilarious in its sloppy, demented extremity and not for the faint of heart or the uninitiated, but if any of that sounds fun to you, you have to see this movie. Seriously. Look it up, read about it, watch trailers. It’s legitimately incredible. Recently reissued by Grindhouse Releasing, this is a digitally remastered, uncut, uncensored version, resplendent in its original glory. 1970 / Not Rated / 1h 23m / Gore

Tickets for “A Nightmare on Franklin Street” classic films are $10 for general admission and $8 for Tampa Theatre Members, available at the box office, located at 711 N. Franklin Street in downtown Tampa, or online at TampaTheatre.org (service fees apply).

 

ABOUT VAULT OF SOULS: The Vault of Souls is a reservations-only evening of elegant fear, with interactive theatrical performances throughout four areas. It is offered every Friday and Saturday night in October at The Vault in downtown Tampa. For details and reservations, visit www.elegantfear.com